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2009 Press Releases
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Official information generated by Holstein Association USA that is released to industry publications
and media outlets.

For further information contact:
Communications, Holstein Association USA


OCTOBER 2009
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  Holstein Association USA Regional Meetings Planned
  Holstein Association USA Releases Video Explaining Dairy Price Stabilization Program
 
SEPTEMBER 2009
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  2010 Delegate Election Continues
 
JULY 2009
  Holstein Association USA Testifies in Washington, D.C. on Behalf of Membership
  2010 Holstein Association USA Award Applications Now Available
  Outstanding Youth Recognized in Distinguished Junior Member Contest
  Participation Strong as Youth Compete at National Junior Holstein Convention
  Junior Holstein Breeders Honored by Holstein Association USA
  Holstein Youth Receive NHWSO Scholarships at National Convention
  2010 Delegate Election Process Has Started
  Holstein Association USA, Inc. Board Meets in Sacramento
  Jan and Jeff King Recognized as 2009 Distinguished Young Holstein Breeders
  Robert Schauf Receives Elite Breeder Award
  Dennis Wolff Named Distinguished Leadership Award Recipient
 
JUNE 2009
  Guest Speakers Slated for National Holstein Convention
  National Holstein Convention Quickly Approaching
 
MAY 2009
  Kelly Joins Holstein Association USA as Manager of Classification Services
  Minnesota Cow Named Holstein Association USA's 2008 Star of the Breed
  Holstein Association USA Recognizes 2009 Herds of Excellence
 
APRIL 2009
  Holstein Association USA Names Distinguished Junior Member Semifinalists
  Outstanding Young Junior Holstein Members Recognized
  Holstein Association USA Board Holds Spring Meeting
 
MARCH 2009
  Natzke Named Overall Collinsworth Winner
  New Essay Contest Announced for Junior Holstein Members
  Application Deadline Approaching for Holstein Association USA Awards
 
FEBRUARY 2009
  Member Participation Shows Strong Interest In Holstein Association USA Programs
     
JANUARY 2009
  Holstein Association USA Launching Redesigned Web Site
  Elliott Joins Holstein Association USA as Southwestern Regional Representative
   



Holstein Association USA Releases Video Explaining Dairy Price Stabilization Program

Brattleboro, Vt. (October 13, 2009)...Holstein Association USA recently produced a video to help dairy producers across the country gain a better understanding of the Dairy Price Stabilization Program (DPSP). The video is available to view or download on the Holstein Association USA Web site at www.holsteinusa.com.

Chief Executive Officer John Meyer has this to say about the newly released video, ?Interest in the Dairy Price Stabilization Program continues to mount. As a result, we are receiving initiations to speak on the topic from coast to coast, and unfortunately are unable to appear at all of the meetings. For those meetings that an official Holstein Association USA representative cannot attend personally, the nine-minute video serves as a good option to hear about the Holstein Association?s innovative program to stabilize milk prices.?

Featuring commentary by Meyer and Gordie Cook, member of the Holstein Association USA board of directors and chair of the Legislative Affairs committee, the video answers commonly asked questions about the DPSP. The video may be viewed online by interested individuals or downloaded to be shown to groups at producer meetings.

The DPSP's primary objective is to prevent severely depressed producer milk prices and reduce the price volatility that has plagued the dairy industry. Holstein Association USA?s plan has been gaining momentum and is receiving the endorsement of producer organizations and milk cooperatives across the country. Through the Association?s Web site, producers around the country are also showing support and providing their endorsement.

To view or download the video, as well as more information about the DPSP or provide your endorsement of the program, Click here. With questions, contact Lucas Sjostrom at 800.952.5200, ext. 4244 or you can email Lucas.

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2010 Delegate Election Continues

Brattleboro, Vt. (September 4, 2009)...The election of delegates to the 2010 National Convention in Bloomington, Minn., June 29 and 30, continues as ballots have been mailed to members. Ballots must be clearly marked and returned to the Executive Secretary on or before Friday, October 30, 2009.

This year, after 18,635 nominating petitions were mailed, 344 were returned containing 591 nominees for the 128 delegates allowed. After 95 nominees withdrew their names, there were six districts with automatic elections since the number of nominees equaled the number of delegates allowed. They are Alabama, Delaware, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma and Special. In addition, six districts did not have any nominees: Arizona, Montana, New Mexico, Rhode Island, West Virginia and Wyoming.

Shortly after all ballots have been recorded, the election will be finalized by the Committee on Elections. Results will then be mailed to all nominees and state officers, along with information on the 2009-2010 Regional Member Meetings. Both delegates and alternates are strongly encouraged to attend Regional Meetings, as are all interested members and guests. Delegates are also advised to make National Convention accommodation and travel reservations as early as possible.

For more information, contact Jessica Strout at 800.952.5200, ext. 4128.

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Holstein Association USA Testifies in Washington, D.C. on Behalf of Membership

Brattleboro, Vt. (July 31, 2009)...On July 28, 2009, Holstein Association USA, Inc. was invited to provide testimony to the House Committee on Agriculture, Subcommittee on Livestock, Dairy and Poultry, during their hearing to discuss the current economic conditions facing the dairy industry.

The following is some of the testimony presented by Gordon M. Cook, Jr., member of the Holstein Association USA board of directors and dairy producer from Hadley, Mass.

The crisis facing America's dairy farmers is well documented. You are aware that basically every dairyman in the country is losing money on every pound of milk they sell.

What has led us to this crisis? The landscape of the dairy industry has changed significantly since our current milk pricing system was established. Sometimes there is a disconnect between the producer and processor which generally is not beneficial to the dairy farmer.

For example, for one gallon of milk that the consumer pays $2.99 at the grocery store, the dairy farmer who produced that milk gets just 91 cents. The bulk of the $2.08 – the difference between what the consumer pays and the farmer receives – goes to the dairy processor, and retailer.

We have seen changes in the quantities of dairy ingredients and products being imported to the United States from other countries. In general, as dairy imports increase, the price paid to U.S. dairy farmers decreases.

A third change is the development of sexed semen and the effect it is having, and will have, on the amount of milk produced in the United States. This year we expect 63,000 extra heifers to enter the national dairy herd, and in 2010, that number is expected to increase to 161,000.

Historically, the U.S. milk pricing system has encouraged dairymen to produce all the milk they can, which has led to instability in prices paid to farmers. In the last four years, we have seen the U.S. All Milk Price average fluctuate between $20.50 and $11.50.

Milk is perishable, unlike other agriculture commodities such as corn, soybeans, and others that can be stored for days, or months until the market reaches an acceptable level. It is time for our industry to change its mindset and start producing milk for the market, instead of hoping we can market all the milk we produce.

The basic objectives of the Holstein Association's Dairy Price Stabilization Program are:

- To prevent severely depressed producer milk prices that result in low and negative returns over feed costs to dairy producers.
- To reduce the volatility of milk prices to dairy producers and thereby reduce the price risk to dairy producers, dairy processors, and consumers of milk and dairy products.
- To complement, and not replace, other existing dairy programs such as the federal dairy price support program and the Milk Income Loss Contract Program. In fact, our program may reduce the federal government cost of both of these two programs.

Here is an overview of the program, and further details have been submitted to the Committee in writing. Let me stress, this Program will not require the Farm Bill to be opened.

The Dairy Price Stabilization Program removes the incentive to produce milk beyond the levels our market demands. It rewards producers who stay in line with market needs.

The U.S. Secretary of Agriculture would administer the program with an advisory Board. The Board will forecast the 12-month domestic and export market demands for fluid milk and manufactured dairy products.

With consideration of the current level of milk production, a determination will be made to the needed change in milk production to fulfill the market needs for each quarter of the next 12 months and return a profitable price to dairymen. This is referred to as the "allowable milk marketings".

Dairy producers who maintain their milk marketings by quarter within the allowable milk marketings will not have to pay market access fees.

Dairy producers who expand their operation and exceed their allowable milk marketings will be assessed a market access fee per hundredweight on total milk marketings. Initially, we would expect the fee to be between $2.00 to $3.00 per hundredweight on all milk marketed as determined by the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture and the Board.

The fees collected from producers paying the market access fee would be distributed as a bonus to the dairy producers who stayed within their allowable milk marketings.

Producers will receive their base by filing their history of milk production and monthly marketings to their area USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) office. The FSA office will notify the producer's milk plant or dairy cooperative to deduct the market access fee, if the producer exceeded their allowable milk marketings.

The cost of the program to taxpayers is nothing. We would expect an assessment of less than two cents per hundredweight to producers on all milk marketings to cover administrative costs of the program.

We are certain that there will need to be some sort of short term fix, such as a temporary 6-12 month raise in price support or some other quick remedy. However, the dairy industry can not keep coming back to Washington for continued bailouts. The Dairy Price Stabilization Program provides a long-term solution.

In closing, the Holstein Association's membership of 30,000 dairy producers of all sizes from coast to coast appreciate the study you are doing on the U.S. dairy crisis. Something needs to be done now to stop the volatile producer milk price roller coaster ride our nation's dairy farmers continue to experience.

The Dairy Price Stabilization Program was developed for dairy producers by dairy producers and is a long-term solution to the problem of milk price volatility. This Program will be beneficial to dairy farmers, milk cooperatives, processors, and consumers.

Click here for more information on Holstein Association USA's Dairy Price Stabilization Program.

For more information, please contact Lindsey Worden, Communications Manager, at 800.952.5200, ext. 4096.

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2010 Holstein Association USA Award Applications Now Available

Brattleboro, Vt. (July 31, 2009)...The 2010 Holstein Association USA award applications are now available online at www.holsteinusa.com. These awards recognize notable members, breeders, and friends of the Association. Please note the new application deadline for the Distinguished Young Holstein Breeder, Elite Breeder, and Distinguished Leadership Award. Applications are due to the national office by February 28, 2010.

The Distinguished Young Holstein Breeder Award recognizes significant accomplishments of young Registered Holstein Breeders, ages 21-40. Applicants can nominate themselves or be nominated, and may apply as individuals, a couple, or business partners. The winning applicant will receive travel and lodging expenses for two to the National Holstein Convention, complimentary tickets to the Convention banquet, a $2,000 cash award, and a plaque.

The Elite Breeder Award honors a living Holstein Association USA member, family, partnership, or corporation who has bred outstanding animals and thereby made a notable contribution to the advancement of U.S. Registered Holsteins. The applicant must have been a member of Holstein Association USA for at least five years. Applications will be considered for three years.

The Distinguished Leadership Award is given to an individual who has provided outstanding and unselfish leadership that has contributed to the improvement of the Holstein Association and/or dairy industry. This is a unique award, as the recipient does not necessarily have to be a member of Holstein Association USA. Applications for this award will also be considered for three years.

Additionally, a scholarship is available to students interested in agriculture who plan to pursue their Master's Degree in Business Administration. The Robert H. Rumler MBA Scholarship awards $3,000 to a qualified individual pursuing their MBA at an accredited university. Applications for this scholarship are due to the Holstein office by April 15, 2010.

Click here for more information on any of these awards, or to obtain an application, contact the national office at 800.952.5200, or check with your state association.

For more information please contact Lindsey Worden, Communications Manager, at 800.952.5200, ext. 4096.

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Outstanding Youth Recognized in Distinguished Junior Member Contest

2009 Distinguished Young Holstein Breeders
top row l-r: Katie Donnan, Robyn Bechtel, Curtis Rhoderick
bottom row l-r: Danielle Brown, Jenna Smith, Matt Mitchell

Brattleboro, Vt. (July 20, 2009)...Holstein Association USA recently recognized the top six finalists in the 2009 National Distinguished Junior Member (DJM) competition at the National Junior Holstein Convention on June 30. This is the highest honor a Junior Holstein member may receive, and is based on outstanding work throughout their dairy project career.

The finalists for this year's contest are Robyn Bechtel, Martinsburg, Pa.; Danielle Brown, Dodgeville, Wis.; Katie Donnan, Galway, N.Y.; Matthew Mitchell, LaFollette, Tenn.; Curtis Rhoderick, Mount Airy, Md., and Jenna Smith, Martinsburg, Pa.

The six finalists were narrowed down from a field of twelve semifinalists that were interviewed at the National Convention, held in Sacramento, Calif. Each of the six finalists will receive annual renewed memberships to Holstein Association USA.

The DJM contest is designed to honor Junior Holstein members ages 17 to 21 who have excelled in their junior project work, involvement on their farm, and in their communities. Twelve semifinalists are selected based on an entry book that includes the story of their junior Holstein work, information about their cattle, involvement in school and community activities, and personal view questions.

For more information or to obtain a photo of the award winners, please contact Lindsey Worden, Communications Manager, at 800.952.5200, ext. 4096.

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Participation Strong as Youth Compete at National Junior Holstein Convention

Brattleboro, Vt. (July 20, 2009)...Youth from across the country traveled to Sacramento, Calif. last week for the National Junior Holstein Convention, with spirits high and friendly competition on their minds.

Public Speaking Contest
There were 38 contestants in this year's Prepared Public Speaking competition. In the Junior division, first place honors went to Charlie Hamilton, Wis., with his speech entitled, "Genomics: New Technology, New Excitement." Second place went to Collin Stoltzfus, Pa., with "Just the Facts" and in third was Tony Lopes, Calif., "The Importance of Promoting the Industry."

In the Intermediate division, first place was Joseph Martinelli, N.J., with "The Lease Program," second was Taylor Pires, Calif., "Society's Ignorance Regarding Agriculture & the Dairy Industry," and third was Katharine Nye, Utah, "Progressing with Power or Backsliding with Ignorance."

Elizabeth Olson, Minn., captured first place in the Senior division with her speech, "Holstein USA: Something to Rely On." In second place was Katie Hanehan, N.Y., "Heart & Soul of Farming," and third went to Rosemary Liskey, Va., "The Next Great Advancement: Genomic Selection in Dairy Cattle."

Folding Display Competition
A record number of entries were submitted this year for the third annual Folding Display competition. Participants create a free-standing display on a dairy industry topic for this contest.

The winning entry in the Junior division was submitted by Cole Davis, N.C., titled "New SHOES for your MOOS." Second place honors went to Karlin Peters, Mo., with "History of Ice Cream" and third was Mary Scott, Iowa, "Which Bull Would You Use?"

In the Intermediate division, Jessica Hammerand, Iowa, had the winning entry with "Carbon Hoofprint." Devon Suiter, N.J., placed second with "Holstein: Your Best Bet in the Dairy Deal." Third place went to Tera Koebel, Mich., "How Big is Your Cows' Carbon Footprint?"

For the senior division, Kayla Demmer, Iowa, placed first with her display, "Genomics." Corbin Wood, Pa., placed second with "Spice It Up with New Dairy Technology" and third went to Cierra Warner, Calif., "Robotic Milkers."

State Scrapbook and Banner Competition
The state scrapbook contest gives each state the opportunity to showcase the Junior Holstein activities they do throughout the year. A total of eight states submitted entries this year, with North Carolina having the winning entry, Iowa placing second, and Virginia in third.

In its second year of existence, the digital scrapbook contest saw seven entries submitted. This division is judged on the same criteria as a traditional scrapbook, but must be presented on a computer, DVD player, or other digital format. Winning this year's contest was Iowa, followed by California in second, and Maryland taking third.

The state banner competition allows states to show off their creative sides. This year there were a total of ten entries that were displayed at convention. First place in the banner contest went to Illinois, second to California, and third to Pennsylvania.

Junior Advisory Committee Election Results
At the Junior Forum on June 30, three new youth area representatives were elected to serve on the Junior Advisory Committee (JAC). For Area I, Parker Welch of Maryland was elected to replace outgoing committee member David Wilson, and Elizabeth Olson of Minnesota will be replacing Linda Behling for Area III. Rocco Cunningham, California, was elected to serve a one-year term for Area IV.

The JAC is the governing body of the Junior Association and oversees the organization's activities. The committee is elected by the membership at the National Junior Forum, and members serve two-year terms. The committee experience helps Juniors learn about running an organization while strengthening leadership skills.

For more information, please contact Lindsey Worden, Communications Manager, at 800.952.5200, ext. 4096.

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Junior Holstein Breeders Honored by Holstein Association USA

Brattleboro, Vt. (July 20, 2009)...Holstein Association USA recognized several Junior members who breed and own exceptional Holstein cattle at the recent National Junior Holstein Convention, June 27-30, in Sacramento, Calif. Given in six different categories based on type and production, the awards are designed to reward and encourage Junior members to continue their excellent Registered Holstein breeding programs.

The Breeder of an Excellent Cow award is presented to Junior members who have bred and owned a cow officially type classified "Excellent" on or after January 1, 2007. The 2009 recipients are: Nathan Arnold, N.Y.; Frank Behling, Wis.; Samantha Foster, Pa.; Casey George, Kan.; Brett Hildebrandt, Wis.; Luther Hillegass, Pa.; Kelly Lee, Wis.; Jordan London, Pa.; Bryant Long, Wis.; Reid Lundy, N.Y.; Ashley Martin, Maine; Matt Mitchell, Tenn.; Tyler Nelson, N.Y.; Caitlyn Pool, Pa.; Chris Potts, Va.; Hayley Potts, Va.; Jarrett Remsberg, Md.; Jocelyn Riser, Pa.; Kevin Shaffer, Pa.; Donald Stoner, Pa.; Natalie Taylor, N.Y.; Robert Walker, Md.; Tony Weier, Wis.; and Matthew Werley, Pa.

The National Breeder of a Multiple "E" Excellent Cow award is received by Junior members who have bred and owned a cow classified Multiple "E" Excellent. The breeders receiving the award are: Ryan Hudyncia, N.Y.; Kelly Lee, Wis.; Justin London, Penn.; Heidi Moff, Ohio; Chris Potts, Va.; and Kevin Shaffer, Pa.

The National Progressive Breeder Award recognizes cattle bred by Junior members that meet high production and classification standards for their age group. Every cow qualifying receives a star and Junior members acquire a star for each elite cow they have bred. This marks the seventeenth year that Juniors were offered the opportunity to apply for the award. Those accumulating five or more stars over their career receive a plaque at National Convention.

One star winners are Annie Achen, Minn.; Stacey Arnold, N.Y.; Patrick Brauning, Md.; Karch Manley, N.Y.; Sam McWilliams, Pa.; Rose Morian, Pa.; Tyler Nell, Pa.; Andrea Pagenkopf, Wis., Caitlyn Pool, Pa.; Natalie Taylor, N.Y.; and Kayla Wright, Wis.

Receiving two stars are Jessica Achen, Minn.; Roxann Achen, Minn.; Carissa Doody, Md.; Alisa Hartle, Pa.; Matt Henkes, Iowa; Kathryn Liskey, Va.; Bret Long, Wis.; Reid Lundy, N.Y.; Mark Musser, Pa.; Hayley Potts, Va.; Nathan Rhoderick, Md.; Jocelyn Riser, Pa.; Kevin Shaffer, Pa.; and Andrew Younker, Pa.

Three star winners are Sean Brown, Wis.; Hilary Hartley, Wis.; Brett Hildebrandt, Wis.; Ty Hildebrandt, Wis.; Zachary Nell, Pa.; Evan Snyder, Pa.; and Corbin Wood, Pa.

Receiving their fourth star are Robyn Bechtel, Pa.; Leah Henkes, Iowa; Jordan London, Pa.; Bryant Long, Wis.; Patrick Lundy, N.Y., Katie Osborne, Pa.; Curtis Rhoderick, Md.; Jenna Smith, Pa.; Eric Troutman, Pa.; and Riley Welker, N.Y.

Five star honorees are Zachary Welker, N.Y. and Alex Yager, Wis.

Six star recipients are Justin London, Pa.; Kayla Moret, Wis.; Melissa Schuler, Pa.; and Alyssa Yager, Wis.

Seven star winners are Rosemary Liskey, Va. and Ashley Martin, Maine.

Eight star winners are Chris Potts, Va. and Holly Wright, Md.

Awarded their ninth star is Amanda Nelson, N.Y.

Receiving their tenth star is Tyler Nelson, N.Y.

Thirteen star honorees are Ava Koebel, Mich. and Krysty Kepler, Wis.

The sixteen star recipient is Matt Mitchell, Tenn.

Awarded twenty stars is Casey George, Kan.

Samantha Foster, Pa., received her twenty second star this year.

The National 30,000 Pound Cow award is received by youth who own a cow producing over 30,000 pounds of milk in 305 days or less, between May 2007 and May 2009. This year's recipients are: Emily Achen, Minn.; Jacob Achen, Minn.; Jessica Achen, Minn.; Roxann Achen, Minn.; Andrew Bechtel, Pa.; Robyn Bechtel, Pa.; Sara Bechtel, Pa.; Frank Behling, Wis.; Douglas Boop, Pa.; Jason Cooper, Pa.; Samantha Foster, Pa.; Jenna Fox, Pa.; Brad Guest, Pa.; Charles Hamilton, Wis.; Katelyn Hamming, Pa.; Alisa Hartle, Pa.; Matt Henkes, Iowa; Travis Holtzinger, Pa.; Mitchell Kappelman, Wis.; Kelly King, Pa.; Kristy King, Pa.; Chelsea Klinger, Pa.; Brandon Long, Wis.; Bret Long, Wis.; Caine Mitchell, Pa.; Hailey Mitchell, Tenn.; Matt Mitchell, Tenn.; Stephanie Nagel, Wis.; Amanda Nelson, N.Y.; Caitlyn Pool, Pa.; Andy Pownall, Pa.; Austin Ream, Pa.; Nathan Schantz, Pa.; Brooke Schoenbachler, Wash.; Melissa Schuler, Pa.; Anthony Seiler, Kan.; Margaret Seiler, Kan.; Jill Seiler, Kan.; Addie Snyder, Pa.; Evan Snyder, Pa.; Ashley Stoltzfus, Pa.; Natalie Taylor, N.Y.; Cory Thompson, Pa.; Jason Troutman, Pa.; Zachary Welker, N.Y.; Ashley Witscher, Pa.; Corbin Wood, Pa.; and Holly Wright, Md.

The National 150,000 Pound Cow award is given to Junior members who own a cow that has produced over 150,000 pounds of milk in her lifetime. 2009 winners are: Austin Acel, Pa.; Jessica Achen, Minn.; Robyn Bechtel, Pa.; David Clowney, Pa.; Samantha Foster, Pa.; Alisa Hartle, Pa.; Matthew Hauck, Pa.; Ty Hildebrandt, Wis.; Luther Hillegass, Pa.; Colton King, Pa.; Bret Long, Wis.; Cody Miller, Pa.; Caine Mitchell, Pa.; Amanda Nelson, N.Y.; Travis Nelson, N.Y.; Jenna Smith, Pa.; and Zachary Welker, N.Y.

The National 200,000 Pound Cow award is given to Junior members who own a cow that has produced over 200,000 pounds of milk in her lifetime. This year's recipients are: Luther Hillegass, Pa.; Brandon Long, Wis.; Bryant Long, Wis.; and Chris Potts, Va.

For more information on these awards, visit www.holsteinusa.com/juniors.

For more information, please contact Lindsey Worden, Communications Manager, at 800.952.5200, ext. 4096.

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Holstein Youth Receive NHWSO Scholarships at National Convention

Brattleboro, Vt. (July 20, 2009)...The National Holstein Women's Scholarship Organization (NHWSO) has announced the 2009 recipients of their annual scholarships. There were a total of eight scholarships awarded to Junior Holstein members at the National Junior Holstein Convention on June 30 in Sacramento, Calif. Each recipient received a $1,500 scholarship to be used toward furthering their education.

The 2009 recipients include: Robyn Bechtel, Pa.; Carolyn Braun, N.Y.; Danielle Brown, Wis.; Elizabeth Cloninger, Pa.; Kayla Demmer, Iowa; Katie Donnan, N.Y.; Nisa Gallichio, Calif.; and Ty Hildebrandt, Wis. Applicants were interviewed at the Convention and judged on their poise, knowledge of the dairy industry, and involvement with their farms and communities.

The NHWSO first began awarding scholarships to deserving Holstein Juniors in 1980. The scholarship fund is supported by a popular silent auction held each year at National Holstein Convention, cookbook sales, and charitable donations. For more information about NHWSO, visit www.nhwso.com.

For more information or to obtain a photo of the award winners, please contact Lindsey Worden, Communications Manager, at 800.952.5200, ext. 4096.

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2010 Delegate Election Process Has Started

Brattleboro, Vt. (July 9, 2009)...The delegate election is underway for the 2010 National Convention in Bloomington, Minn., June 29-30, 2010.  Nominating petitions have been mailed out, and will need to be returned to Holstein Association USA, Inc. on or before July 29, 2009. 

The following individuals are ineligible to be nominated, having served at the last three consecutive National Conventions:

Michael Allen, MD
Brian Behnke, WI
James Cook, VA
Lynn Harbaugh, WI
Ken Janes, OH
Dan Moon, IA
Donna Myers, MD
Lee Salonen, NH
Robert Schauf, WI
Peter Spike, OH
Ester Welch, OH
Russell Wirt, MN
Darrell Gene Wright, NC

In order to be valid, nominating petitions must be signed by a Holstein Association USA member. Members are also encouraged to nominate more than the number of delegates allowed for their district, in case a substitute is needed.  Once a member is nominated, he or she will receive notification.  Nominees then need to inform Holstein Association USA if they wish to remove their name from the ballot no later than August 13.

For more information, please contact Jodi Hoynoski at 800.952.5200 ext. 4261.

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Holstein Association USA, Inc. Board Meets in Sacramento

Brattleboro, Vt. (July 7, 2009)...The Holstein Association USA board of directors held its summer meeting on June 26-27, 2009 in Sacramento, California. President Doug Maddox chaired the two-day meeting held in conjunction with the National Holstein Convention and Annual Meeting.

Following the board's dinner on June 26th, Vice President Tande presented resolutions honoring this year's retiring president Doug Maddox of California, and directors Glen Brown of Utah and Tom Thorbahn of Ohio.

The topic taking center stage during the board's meeting was the Holstein Association's Dairy Price Stabilization Program. The board reaffirmed ongoing efforts to build awareness and support for the program.

Update on the 2009 Business Plan
During the meeting, staff presented updates on the 2009 Management-by-Objective Business Plan and year-to-date financials. From January to May, registrations totaled 140,457 which is a 10 percent decrease from the same period in 2008. Transfers totaled 31,500 so far this year, down 6 percent from 2008.

The Holstein COMPLETE program remains popular with members as 1,773 herds and 232,584 animals were enrolled at the end of May 2009. A comparison between enrollments as of May 2008 and May of this year indicates the COMPLETE program experienced a one percent decrease in the number of herds, while the number of cows enrolled increased by eight percent. As of May 2009, the classification team scored 87,772 cows in 2,159 herds, which is a decrease in classification activity of 12 percent for the same period in 2008.

2009 Financial Update
Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer Barbara Casna presented to the board the Holstein Association's consolidated financial statements as of May 31, 2009 and reviewed the reserve fund report for the same time period. The Association and its subsidiaries show year-to-date profit on operations of $117,000.

Other Board Action
From the Show Committee, the board approved a recommendation that would create a preliminary list of nominees qualified to judge all National Holstein shows, including Junior shows. Once finalized by the board, the Holstein Association National Judges List would become effective in 2010.

The board approved the creation and design of an Official Holstein International Pedigree which expresses crude protein and milk production in kilograms.

The board voted to support a resolution presented by a New York member to be submitted to the Constitution, Bylaws, and Resolutions Committee and presented at the 2009 annual meeting. The resolution seeks support of the termination of a contract between seven A.I. organizations and USDA that prevents genomic testing of bulls by others not included in the agreement.

Acting on a recommendation from the Junior Advisory Committee, the board approved the appointment to the committee of Darrel Rennich from South Dakota.

The Holstein Association board of directors approved the recommendation of the Holstein Foundation board of trustees to appoint the following trustees, each for a three-year term: Kimberly Clauss, Joel Hastings, Rob Kolb, and David Pelzer.

Upcoming Meetings
The next meeting of the board will take place in Chicago on November 19-20, 2009.

For more information, please contact Lindsey Worden, Communications Manager, at 800.952.5200, ext. 4096.

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Jan and Jeff King Recognized as 2009 Distinguished Young Holstein Breeders

2009 Distinguished Young Holstein Breeders
Vice President Larry A. Tande, President Doug Maddox, Becky King, Jeff King, Jan King, Pandora Davis, and CEO John M. Meyer

Brattleboro, Vt. (July 7, 2009)...Jan and Jeff King of Kings-Ransom Farm, LLC, Schuylerville, N.Y., are Holstein Association USA's 2009 Distinguished Young Holstein Breeders. They were presented with the award at the recent National Holstein Convention in Sacramento, Calif.

Growing up on a farm, Jan and Jeff have been actively involved in the Registered Holstein business their entire lives. Participating in several Junior Holstein programs when they were younger, their love of working with dairy cattle stayed with them through college. After graduating from Cornell University in 1990 and 1993, respectively, Jan and Jeff returned to their home operation - Kings-Ransom Farm.

The brothers began managing the day-to-day operations of the farm, with major decisions being made jointly with their parents, Edgar and Carolyn. In 1996, the family set up a long-term buyout agreement, which allowed Jan and Jeff to steadily gain ownership of the operation.

Today, Kings-Ransom Farm has expanded and diversified. The Kings are milking 900 Registered Holsteins and farming 2,450 acres. Milking three times per day, their herd currently averages 27,132 pounds of milk, 988 pounds of fat and 844 pounds of protein.

Herd Management
The Kings use EASY ID software and Official Holstein Tag ID to register the calves on their farm. The milking animals are also enrolled in TriStar Deluxe for production record information.

A large emphasis is put on providing cows with a comfortable and consistent environment, which encourages high milk production. Cows are housed in sand-bedded freestalls to maximize resting time and cow comfort.

"Our main focus is to produce a large volume of milk at a low cost of production to maintain the viability of our farm business," said King. "Producing a high quality product isn't just a goal - we feel it's the only alternative."

Breeding Program
When Jan and Jeff took over the management of the herd breeding decisions, they tried to keep costs low by using medium priced bulls across the entire herd. They realized this was holding them back from taking their genetics to the next level, so the decision was made to use young sires on the lower end of the herd while utilizing the best bulls available on the top end. They continued that strategy for five or six years, and now use the top bulls across their entire herd.

"We believe that choosing the best sires has resulted in the most genetic gain and herd improvement for us. We extensively research the bulls that we are interested in using, sourcing information from anyone who might know something about them. We select the top bulls for type and production, using TPI as our guide, then refine our list based on information from our research."

Current selection criteria for herd sires includes minimums of 1800 TPI and 2.00 for Type and Udder Composites, as well as positive values for Productive Life and Daughter Pregnancy Rate.

Embryo transfer is another tool utilized heavily on the farm to increase the impact of the best cow families in the herd. Their herd size provides a significant pool of recipients to implant their valuable embryos.

"Our entire breeding program is focused on producing profitable genetics - genetics that will increase our herd's profit potential through production and longevity, and genetics that will be profitable for those who may purchase them from us," said King. "We enjoy the continual challenge to select the best genetics and make the best matings in order to produce the results that we strive for."

Kings-Ransom has been recognized as a Progressive Genetics Herd for 11 years, with an average CTPI of 1407. Since Jan and Jeff have been responsible for the breeding program, they have bred over 70 Excellent cows. The Kings are proud to currently have over 40 Excellent and 135 Very Good cows in the herd. They have had 25 Gold Medal Dams and 23 Dams of Merit, as well as 12 cows that have produced over 200,000 pounds of lifetime milk. Forty-nine of their animals have earned a spot on the current Locator List.

Kings-Ransom genetics are in high demand, with a successful merchandising program founded on solid cow families. They have sold over 160 bulls into AI, and currently have three on the Top 100 TPI list, with two more on the High Genomic Young Sires list. Many of their bulls trace back to a cow purchased as an embryo, Pen-Col Mtoto Dima-ET, classified Very Good-88, with two production records over 40,000 pounds of milk. Another successful brood cow they bred is Kings-Ransom RM Destiny-ET, scored EX-93. Destiny has had high-selling daughters in sales over the past few years, with several promising offspring still in the herd.

Community Involvement
Jan and Jeff strive to balance the demands of running their business with continued community involvement. They are involved with several agricultural organizations, including local, county and state Holstein clubs, Farm Bureau, Farm Credit, their town planning board, and also enjoy coaching youth football and basketball.

Jan and Jeff enjoy carrying on the family tradition with Registered Holstein cattle. They are also quick to credit their wives and families as key members of the Kings-Ransom team. Jan and his wife, Pandora Davis, have two children, Nathaniel, 4, and Hannah, 2. Jeff and his wife, Becky, have three children, Johnathan, 9, Adam, 7, and Lauren, 4.

For more information or to obtain a photo of the award winner, please contact Lindsey Worden, Communications Manager, at 800.952.5200, ext. 4096.

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Robert Schauf Receives Elite Breeder Award

Elite Breeder Award
Vice President Larry A. Tande, President Doug Maddox, Karyn Schauf, Robert Schauf, and CEO John M. Meyer

Brattleboro, Vt. (July 7, 2009)...Robert Schauf, Barron, Wis. has been selected as the recipient of Holstein Association USA's 2009 Elite Breeder Award. Schauf was honored at the recent National Holstein Convention in Sacramento, Calif. The award recognizes a Holstein breeder who bred outstanding animals, making a notable contribution to the advancement of the Holstein breed in the United States.

Through his early years working with Registered cattle, Schauf developed a breeding philosophy based on strong cow families, striving to breed powerful cows that consistently transmit a balance of both superior type and production. He and his wife, Karen, began their own farm, milking cattle under the Alpine-Haven prefix in Southern Wisconsin. In 1981, they purchased her grandparent's farm in Northwest Wisconsin, founding Indianhead Holsteins, where the family has been ever since.

Schauf's consistent breeding philosophy shows through in his impressive herd statistics. Indianhead has a Rolling Herd Average of 27,298 pounds of milk, 1,073 pounds of fat, and 826 pounds of protein. After their most recent classification, the herd's BAA stands at 112%, with 39 cows scored Excellent, 43 Very Good, and one Good Plus. Through the years, under the Indianhead prefix, Schauf has bred over 180 Excellent cows and over 370 cows scored Very Good.

Indianhead cattle are in demand both domestically and internationally. Schauf has merchandised cattle to several countries, including Japan, Germany, Canada, Italy and the United Kingdom, just to name a few. In 2007, he was recognized with the Wisconsin Governor's Export Achievement Award for his successful international cattle marketing efforts. Over the years, Indianhead has sent over 60 bulls into AI, including legends such as Indianhead Red-marker-ET, a former #1 Type bull and sire of many show ring champions across the country.

The ability to produce generations of Excellent cows has become the trademark of Indianhead Holsteins. Schauf has wisely invested in genetics from many of the breed's most prominent cow families, taken the bloodlines, and written his own story through their offspring. Most notably, Stookey Elm Park Blackrose-ET, purchased as a heifer in partnership with Mark Rueth and Mark Van Mersbergen, has had an undeniable impact on the Indianhead herd and the Holstein breed through her many sons and daughters. Scored Excellent-96 herself, Blackrose was renowned for her outstanding show ring career, admirable milk production, and most importantly, her ability to transmit those traits to her progeny. Of her 42 classified offspring in the U.S., 21 are scored Excellent and 18 are scored Very Good.

Countless other Indianhead cattle have garnered show ring accolades for the Schauf family, including Champion honors at the Minnesota State Fair, Wisconsin Spring Show, Wisconsin Championship Show, and class winners at World Dairy Expo. They won the competitive Wisconsin Holstein Futurity four times, and have earned numerous Premier Breeder and Premier Exhibitor banners through the course of Schauf's outstanding Holstein career.

Schauf finds it important to be a positive spokesperson for the Holstein breed and dairy industry, and has opened his farm to the media multiple times. He is active in several local and state agricultural organizations, is a past Wisconsin Holstein Association President, and has served as a delegate to the National Holstein Convention for several years.

Bob and Karyn have four sons - Christian, Gabriel, Zachary and Jacob.

For more information or to obtain a photo of the award winner, please contact Lindsey Worden, Communications Manager, at 800.952.5200, ext. 4096.

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Dennis Wolff Named Distinguished Leadership Award Recipient

Distinguished Leadership Award
Vice President Larry A. Tande, President Doug Maddox, Josey Valenti, Dennis Wolff, and CEO John M. Meyer

Brattleboro, Vt. (July 7, 2009)...Dennis Wolff, Millville, Pa., is the 2009 recipient of Holstein Association USA's Distinguished Leadership Award. This award recognizes an individual who has made a career of providing outstanding and unselfish leadership for the betterment of the dairy industry. Wolff received the award at the recent National Holstein Convention in Sacramento, Calif.

Wolff spent many years as a dairyman in Pennsylvania, developing his operation, Pen-Col Farms, into a globally recognized prefix by pioneering embryo exports, marketing genetics to over 30 countries around the world.

In 2003, Wolff was confirmed as the Pennsylvania Secretary of Agriculture. Since then, he has put in place many state initiatives to help safeguard and grow the dairy industry. During his tenure, he created the Pennsylvania Dairy Task Force and developed a strategic plan to ensure a stable future for their state dairy industry. As part of the Task Force, several programs have been enacted, including the Center for Dairy Excellence, which helps farmers develop steps to improve the profitability and milk yields of their business.

In 2006, Wolff called for the creation of the Northeast Dairy Leadership Team, which leverages agricultural leadership in Pennsylvania, New York, and Vermont to help influence federal dairy policy. This team worked on several key issues in the 2008 Farm Bill for the benefit of dairy farmers across the country. Other initiatives that he has led include the Center for Farm Transitions, Pennsylvania Grows, and Act 38, a law which gives farmers the right to challenge unfair local ordinances that infringe on their ability to farm.

Aside from his duties as the Secretary of Agriculture, Wolff also lends his time and expertise to other organizations. Since 2000, he has served on the World Trade Organization's Agriculture Technical Committee. His successful work as a member of this committee has enhanced the ability for other dairymen to export embryos of all dairy breeds. He has been a member of the Pennsylvania State University Board of Trustees since 2001, and served on the University of Pennsylvania Board of Overseers since 2004.

This is not the first time Wolff has been honored for his service to the industry. He was recently awarded the "Best Available Technology Award" by the National Agribusiness Technology Center for his leadership in developing a software system, improving animal health issue management in Pennsylvania. He received an Honorary FFA American Farmer Degree in 2005, and was recognized as a Master Farmer in 1994.

Wolff is also the President and Founder of the Nicholas Wolff Foundation and Camp Victory, which was established in 1987 on 35 acres of the Wolff's home farm. Camp Victory is designed for handicapped and chronically ill children, to provide them a camp they can attend to meet other youth facing the same issues they are, make friends, and have fun. Today, the camp covers 120 acres of land and serves over 1200 special needs children each summer.

For more information or to obtain a photo of the award winner, please contact Lindsey Worden, Communications Manager, at 800.952.5200, ext. 4096.

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Guest Speakers Slated for National Holstein Convention

Dr. Robert Cropp
Dr. Robert Cropp

Brattleboro, Vt. (June 15, 2009)...Holstein Association USA has organized several guest speakers to address the attendees of the National Holstein Convention, to be held June 27-30, 2009, in Sacramento, Calif. The popular topics of genomics and milk pricing will be discussed by industry experts and members.

A special Early Bird session on Monday, June 29, from 7:15 to 8:45 a.m., will feature a panel discussion on Genomics. Attendees will hear from AI representatives, Holstein breeders and Holstein Association USA staff. Panelists include Angie Coburn, Dairy Procurement Manager for Genex Cooperative; Greg Coyne, Coyne Farms, Avon, N.Y.; Dr. Marj Faust, Director of External Research for ABS Global; Bob LaSalle, Slo-Train Holsteins, Firebaugh, Calif.; Pat Maddox, RuAnn & Maddox Dairies, Riverdale, Calif.; and Bill Peck, Welcome Stock Farm, Schuylerville, N.Y. These individuals will give their insights on this exciting new technology, and those in attendance will be provided the opportunity to ask questions of the panelists.

The featured guest speaker on Monday afternoon will be Dr. Robert Cropp, Professor Emeritus for the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Cropp will discuss Holstein Association USA's Dairy Price Stabilization Program from 1:45 to 3:15 p.m. He has devoted the past 42 years to working with agricultural cooperatives and on dairy marketing and policy issues, and has served as an advisor for the development of Holstein Association USA's proposed price stabilization plan. Through the years, Dr. Cropp's dairy extension and outreach programs have targeted dairy farmers, dairy cooperatives, and dairy leaders in regards to milk marketing, milk pricing, dairy price risk management and federal dairy policy.

For more information about the National Holstein Convention, including registration and lodging information, visit www.holsteinconvention2009.com.

For more information or to obtain a photo of Dr. Cropp, please contact Lindsey Worden, Communications Manager, at 800.952.5200, ext. 4096.

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National Holstein Convention Quickly Approaching

Brattleboro, Vt. (June 12, 2009)...Final preparations are being made for the 124th National Holstein Convention and Annual Meeting, June 27-30, 2009 in Sacramento, Calif. The California Convention Planning Committee and volunteers are eager to welcome Holstein members from across the country to their state for what promises to be an exciting and memorable National Convention.

Convention events will begin on Saturday, June 27 with several Junior competitions and the Wine and Cheese Social. Attendees will have the opportunity to learn more about California during Host Day tours on Sunday, June 28. A nondenominational devotional service will also be held that morning. Host Day concludes with the California National Convention Sale, featuring several lots of premium Registered HolsteinSM genetics.

The Holstein Association USA Annual Business Meeting will take place on Monday, June 29 and Tuesday, June 30. An Early Bird panel covering the popular topic of Genomics will be held on Monday morning, prior to the start of the meeting. Panelists include representatives from the A.I. industry, as well as Registered Holstein breeders from around the country. Later in the day, members will hear reports from CEO John M. Meyer and President Doug Maddox. The Association's Forty-Year members will be recognized on Monday, as well as the Star of the Breed and Herd of Excellence honorees.

An exciting feature of Monday's meeting will be a discussion of Holstein Association USA's Dairy Price Stabilization Program by Dr. Robert A. Cropp, Professor Emeritus in Agricultural and Applied Economics at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. Dr. Cropp has been serving as an advisor for the development of the program.

Officer and director elections are slated for the second day of the Annual Meeting. Larry Tande of Medford, Minn. will be seeking the office of President. Three candidates have declared their candidacy for the office of Vice President: John Bierbaum, Burnsville, Minn.; Tom Thorbahn, Vickery, Ohio; and Chuck Worden, Cassville, N.Y.

Four members will be elected to the Association's board of directors. The candidate for Region 5 is Robert Nigh of Viroqua, Wis. Contending for the Region 8 seat are Bill Stoltzfus, Buhl, Idaho, and Bill Wright, McCornick, Utah. Incumbent Hank van Exel is up for re-election in Region 9, and for the At-Large position, three candidates have declared: Dennis A. Areias, Los Banos, Calif.; Thomas F. Atherton, Gaines, Mich.; and Jonathan Lamb, Oakfield, N.Y.

The Convention will conclude on Tuesday evening with the Gold Nugget Gala Banquet, where the recipients of the Distinguished Young Holstein Breeder, Elite Breeder and Distinguished Leadership Award will be revealed.

Juniors have several exciting events taking place during the Convention, including Dairy Jeopardy and Prepared Public Speaking on Saturday and the popular Dairy Bowl competition on Monday. Holstein Association USA's website, www.holsteinusa.com, will be updated daily during Convention with pictures, contest results, and daily summaries. If you cannot join us in California, be sure to check in to see the latest news.

For updates on Convention activities or for lodging information, visit www.holsteinconvention2009.com.

For more information, contact Lindsey Worden, Communications Manager, at 800.952.5200, ext. 4096.

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Kelly Joins Holstein Association USA as Manager of Classification Services

Kristie Kelly
Kristie Kelly

Brattleboro, Vt. (May 15, 2009)...Holstein Association USA is pleased to welcome Kristie Kelly, Winchester, N.H., as Manager of Classification Services. In this capacity, Kelly will be responsible for scheduling of herds for type evaluation, staff scheduling, and ensuring that high-quality customer service is provided to members.

"We are excited that Kristie will be joining the Holstein Association," said Dan Meihak, Executive Director of Herd Advancement Services. "Her dairy farming background and experience make her a natural for the position."

Kelly has most recently worked on her family's dairy, Kelly-View Farm, and for University of Vermont Extension as the Youth Development Professional and Outreach Coordinator. She received her degree from Lyndon State College in 1993.

In her spare time, Kristie enjoys volunteering her time as a 4-H leader.

"I am very excited for the opportunity to work with Holstein Association USA," said Kelly. "I look forward to serving the members and being an asset to the Holstein team."

For more information, contact Lindsey Worden, Communications Manager, at 800.952.5200, ext. 4096.

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Minnesota Cow Named Holstein Association USA's 2008
Star of the Breed

Star of the Breed

The winner of this year's Star of the Breed award, Stuewes FB Giddy-ET is owned by Andrew Stuewe, Flower-Brook Holsteins, Hamburg, Minn. Shown from left are, Andrew, his wife Jodene, and daughter Ava.

Brattleboro, Vt. (May 13, 2009)...Stuewes FB Giddy-ET is the 2008 recipient of the Star of the Breed award presented by Holstein Association USA. This award recognizes the complete Holstein cow - an animal that excels in both the show ring and milking parlor. She is the second cow to be honored with this distinction.

Giddy is owned by Andrew Stuewe, with his wife Jodene, and daughter Ava, of Flower-Brook Registered Holsteins in Hamburg, Minn. She was bred by David Stuewe, Andrew's father.

Sired by Boulet Charles-ET, Giddy was born on June 14, 2003. She is classified EX-94, and has a record of 3-03 365 42,270 5.6%F 2369 3.3%P 1407. Her dam is Stuewes Milan Gabrielle EX-93 2E. Gabrielle is having a lasting impact on the Flower-Brook herd, with 32 descendants on the farm. Her best record is 8-06 365 33,970 4.0%F 1363 3.4%P 1151. Behind Gabrielle are three more Very Good dams, making Giddy a fifth-generation VG or EX.

Of Giddy's twelve maternal sisters that are classified, three are scored Excellent, including a full sister at EX-92. Six of her sisters are classified Very Good.

In 2008, Giddy was the second place five-year old at the Midwest Spring National Holstein Show, and fourth place five-year old at the Midwest Fall National Holstein Show.

To be eligible for the Star of the Breed award, a cow must place in the top five in her class at a National Holstein Show, be in a herd enrolled in the TriStar program, and have an official classification score. Once the eligible cows are determined, the following calculation is used to decide the recipient: Combined ME Fat and Protein + Age Adjusted Classification Score x (Breed Average ME CFP/Breed Average Age Adjusted Score).

Flower-Brook Registered Holsteins is enrolled in Holstein COMPLETE, and currently milking 70 Registered Holstein cows with a Rolling Herd Average of 26,300 pounds of milk.

For more information, contact Lindsey Worden, Communications Manager, at 800.952.5200, ext. 4096.

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Holstein Association USA Recognizes 2009 Herds of Excellence

Brattleboro, Vt. (May 13, 2009)...Holstein Association USA is proud to recognize the recipients of the 2009 Herd of Excellence recognition. An elite group of eleven members from around the United States have met the strict criteria to qualify for this prestigious award.

The herd standards for the award include: Must be 25 percent above breed average Mature Equivalent (ME) for milk, fat, and protein; must have classified within the last year and have an actual average classification score of 83 points or higher; must have at least 70 percent of the herd homebred; and must be enrolled in the Association's TriStar program.

Six of this year's honorees have accomplished this impressive feat for the second consecutive year. 2008 was the first year the award was presented. Read on for profiles of these outstanding member herds.

Sunny-Valley Holsteins
Tim and Jennifer Baker

Tim Baker
Star-Summit Holsteins, Byron Center, Mich.

Tim Baker took over managing his 75-cow operation from his parents, Henry and Ruth, in 1997. Today, the herd is 92.21 percent homebred, with ME production averages of 32,010 pounds of milk, 1,170 pounds of fat, and 1,005 pounds of protein, and has an average classification score of 87.76 points. This is the second year that Star-Summit Holsteins has been honored as a Herd of Excellence, and they have been named a Progressive Breeders Registry herd for 26 years.

The cows are housed in sand-bedded freestalls and milked twice a day in a tie-stall barn. The herd has been on Holstein COMPLETE for a year and a half. Baker says that he strives for a balance of type and production in his breeding program. He doesn't like to single out any one trait as being most important, but does make sure that the bulls used in the herd are strong in feet and legs.

Cow families are very important to Baker, and he believes that developing strong cow families has definitely paid off in his herd over the years. A cow that Tim purchased when he was a junior in high school has been the foundation of one of his best cow families. She scored EX-91 5E and produced over 265,000 pounds of lifetime milk. Tim has marketed a great deal of cattle and embryos from his herd, which he feels has made a big difference in his bottom line.

Tim and his wife, Jennifer, have three children, Gerrit-10, Jack-8, and Elise-4.



Hill-Ton Holsteins
Joe, Jeff and Andy Brantmeier

Joseph Brantmeier
Hilrose Holsteins, Sherwood, Wis.

Hilrose Holsteins is a family farm, managed by Joe Brantmeier, and sons Andy and Jeff. They have received the Progressive Breeders Registry award for 19 years, and been named a Progressive Genetics Herd twice. The herd is 83.5 percent homebred, with an average classification score of 85.5 and ME production averages of 32,827 pounds of milk, 1,265 pounds of fat, and 957 pounds of protein. They also received the Herd of Excellence award in 2008.

The Brantmeiers are currently milking 110 cows twice a day in their tie-stall barn. The herd has been on COMPLETE since the program began, because they like having all of the programs bundled together, and enjoy using the included pedigrees when selling groups of cattle. They also register their calves with Tag ID and EASY, and classify regularly.

Joe and his two sons have equal input when deciding what bulls will be used in their breeding program. They strive to use the best bulls that are available, and place a strong emphasis on overall type. Brantmeiers value the extra income generated by merchandising their genetics. They regularly consign to several sales, have recently exported embryos, sold bulls into A.I., and have built up a private market for their animals with repeat buyers. They have had several animals produce high lifetime milk records, and feel that it all goes back to providing the animals with good, solid care.

"We love working with cattle. I feel really good that all three of my kids are very involved in the industry - somewhere along the line we made it an enjoyable livelihood," said Brantmeier. Joe's wife, Chris, is a long time school teacher, and daughter Sarah works for Pfizer.

 

Ideal Holsteins
Back: Trent, Brandon, and Brooks Hendrickson
Front: Breinne, Kate, Jeff, and Kelsi Hendrickson

Jeffrey and Kate Hendrickson
Jeffrey-Way Holsteins, Belleville, Wis.

Jeff and Kate Hendrickson have a 75-cow herd, of which 97.44 percent are homebred. Their average classification score is 85.26, and ME production averages are 31,506 pounds of milk, 1,173 pounds of fat, and 953 pounds of protein.

Jeff has been working with Registered Holsteins for almost 30 years, having grown up on a dairy farm. He worked as a herdsman for a few years, and purchased a cow when that herd dispersed, which was the beginning of his own herd.

When making mating decisions, Hendrickson generally tries to use higher TPISM bulls and popular sires, with an emphasis on type and udder composites. Over 90% of the herd belongs to their "T" family. Jeffrey-Way Mascot Tina-ET 3E-91 GMD DOM is the cow that put their farm "on the map." Hendrickson says that she helped pay for their farm through the sale of her progeny. Twenty-one of her 24 classified daughters are scored Very Good or Excellent. Many high producing cows, show winners, and bulls have come from this family for Jeffrey-Way.

Hendrickson sees several positives to being involved with Registered Holsteins. "We enjoy working with good cattle. The Registered Holsteins have a lot of added value and give us the opportunity to sell extra cows as breeding stock, bulls into A.I., and market embryos," Jeff said.

All of the Hendrickson's five children are involved on the farm in some aspect. Brandon, 32, works for the county and assists with field work when he can, Kelsi, 22, works as an assistant editor for Agri-View newspaper and helps in her free time, and Trent, 21, is in college and comes home on the weekends and during the summer to work. Breinne, 17, and Brooks, 15, both help with chores on a daily basis.

 

Morningview Holsteins
Jay Houser, Karen Auman and James Houser

Jay and James Houser, Barbara Kerstetter,
and Karen Aumen

Penn-Dell Farms, Spring Mills, Pa.

Jay Houser has been operating Penn-Dell Farms since 1963. The herd is 96.05 percent homebred, with an average classification score of 85.07 points, and ME production averages of 32,518 pounds of milk, 1,359 pounds of fat, and 972 pounds of protein.

The herd is enrolled in Holstein COMPLETE and uses Tag ID to register their calves. When Jay was growing up, their herd was the first in Mifflin County, Pa. to classify, and they have scored almost every time they've had the opportunity since then. Penn-Dell has received the Progressive Breeders Registry award for 37 years and have been a Progressive Genetics Herd for 18 years.

Houser has always liked to breed his cattle for milk production. He and his son make mating decisions together, and they try to mate each cow to improve upon her weaknesses. Jay commented that Round-Oak Rag Apple Elevation has had more impact on their herd than any bull they have ever used.

"The greatest asset in my mind to owning Registered Holsteins is that we have been able to subsidize our milk income by selling offspring of our cattle, both male and female," said Houser. "I don't like the idea that you have to live on just milk, and it's very hard to supplement your income without the Registered cattle."

Jay is very proud to have all five of his children involved in the dairy industry. His son James and daughter Karen Aumen take care of milking their 70 cows twice a day. Daughters Barbara Kerstetter and Sandra Haagen help Jay with the bookkeeping and finances for the farm. Another daughter, Mary Ellen Storm, lives in Wisconsin on a dairy farm. Jay's grandchildren are taking an interest and enjoy being involved with the dairy as well.

 

Jafral Holsteins
Kevin Huie and Allen Johnson

Allen Johnson
Jafral Holsteins, Hamptonville, N.C.

Jafral Holsteins is a 40-cow herd owned and operated by Allen Johnson. Their average classification score is 84.04, with ME production averages of 34,354 pounds of milk, 1,301 pounds of fat, and 1,009 pounds of protein on twice daily milking. The herd is 100 percent homebred, with most of the cows tracing back to two cow families, Rilara Mars Las Ravena EX-91 2E GMD and Bonnyside Bova Brenda EX-90 2E GMD.

This is the second year that Jafral has been honored as a Herd of Excellence. They have also received the Progressive Breeders Registry award for 11 years, and the Progressive Genetics Herd award for 14 years, with a 2008 average CTPI of 1578. The herd has been on Holstein COMPLETE for three years.

Johnson became involved in the Registered business in 1974. His family had a dairy with mostly grade cattle, and decided to invest in Registered animals because of their added value. The next seven years were spent building up their herd to 100 percent Registered, and it has been that way ever since.

Johnson likes tall cattle with wide front ends, deep bodies, and width through their rumps. "What we've experienced is if you breed the width into them, you get everything else along with it," said Allen. The cattle are housed in freestalls, with the goal of cow comfort top of mind. "We especially try to keep the cows cool during the summer, and always feed them the best feed that we can. Cow comfort is very important."

Working alongside Allen is his nephew, Kevin Huie. The two are responsible for all of the day-to-day labor on the farm.

 

Dirt-Road Holsteins
Sandi Hock, Jan Jurbala, Eli Klinger,
Chelsea Klinger, Dyllan Klinger
and Zachary Klinger

Jan Jurbala
Spotlite-J Holsteins, Orangeville, Pa.

Jan Jurbala started Spotlite-J Holsteins in 1977, and is now milking 46 cows twice daily. The herd has ME production averages of 32,220 pounds of milk, 1,173 pounds of fat, and 995 pounds of protein, is 79.63 percent homebred and has an average classification score of 83.2 points.

The cows are fed a ration of high moisture corn, soybean meal, corn silage, and hay. A robotic feeder loops around the barn nine times per day. A computerized system allows Jan to make adjustment to individual animal's rations as needed. Her herd is somewhat unique in the fact that she has always used mostly young sires in her breeding program, choosing sons of the top sires. She selects primarily for type, and correctively mates cows individually.

One cow that is having an impact on her herd is Spotlite-J RHero Sherry, EX-94 2E. She is the great-granddaughter of a cow that Jan purchased in a dispersal years ago. Sherry has received numerous accolades in the show ring and has some promising young daughters in the herd.

Friend Sandi Hock assists with milking, raises the calves and heifers for the farm, and owns some cattle with Jurbala. Jan's daughter, son-in-law, and grandchildren all live at the farm and enjoy being involved.

When asked about her 'secret to success', Jurbala replied "It really helps to pay attention to the details. I also enjoy talking to people who're successful to see what they're doing right. You can never know too much!"

 

Star-Summit Holsteins
Bruce and Brenda Long

Bruce and Brenda Long
B-Long Holsteins, New London, Wis.

Bruce and Brenda Long own and operate B-Long Holsteins with their sons, Bryant-19, and twins Bret and Brandon-17. Currently milking 55 cows twice a day, the herd's ME production averages are 35,190 pounds of milk, 1,219 pounds of fat, and 1,025 pounds of protein, with an average classification score of 83.66. The herd is 96.23 percent homebred.

B-Long Holsteins was also recognized as a Herd of Excellence last year, and has been named a Progressive Genetics Herd for 13 years. Bruce and Brenda received the Distinguished Young Holstein Breeders Award in 2007.

The herd is fed a TMR consisting mainly of corn silage, baled hay, cottonseed and soybean meal. Long likes large cows with plenty of strength, depth, and width throughout. This emphasis on frame comes through in his mating decisions, where he also tries to use bulls that are positive for components. Bruce feels that type is important because it increases the value and marketability of their cattle. They have had the opportunity to export embryos overseas and market bulls to studs over the years.

Long feels the key to the success of their herd is consistency. "It takes several things coming together - you have to keep your cows comfortable, have a solid breeding program, and feed them right," said Bruce. The Longs enjoy working together as a family and exhibiting their cattle at shows. They take pride in their homebred animals, and have not purchased any replacements in several years.

 

Mainstream Holsteins
From left, Mark Brehm, Libby Schmitt, Tim Schmitt, Tom Schmitt, Peter Schmitt and Zach Nilles.

Paul, Tom, and Tim Schmitt
Morningview Holsteins, Durango, Iowa

Morningview Holsteins is an 88-cow operation that is 83.8 percent homebred. The herd has an average classification score of 84.8, and ME production averages of 32,046 pounds of milk, 1,202 pounds of fat, and 948 pounds of protein. Morningview was also recognized as a Herd of Excellence last year, and has been named a Progressive Breeders Registry herd for 12 years. The Schmitts have been a Progressive Genetics Herd for 14 years and had the highest average CTPI in the country in 2008, at 1669.

The herd has been on COMPLETE since the program started, and use EASY and Tag ID with custom tags to register their calves. Tom says that it's easy to see the value of Registered Holsteins, especially in today's economic climate. "When the milk check can't cover the bills, it's nice to have Registered cattle to market to cover expenses and make a living," he says. "We enjoy being able to stay small in numbers and still provide income for three families."

The Schmitts focus on breeding the 'complete' cow. Tom says that they breed for cows with great udders and feet and legs, to create cattle that will be highly marketable. One of their more well-known cows is Morningview Converse Judy EX-93 GMD DOM. At 4-05 she produced 38,100 4.1%F 1565 3.1%P 1197. She has 64 Registered offspring, with the majority that are classified scored Very Good or Excellent. The Schmitt family is busy preparing for their 'Tribute to Converse Judy' sale, which will be held June 5th at the farm.

"Like any business, you have to do the little things to be successful," said Tom. "That will make or break things. On top of that, keep informed as to what is going on in the industry. Things are always changing, especially in the world of marketing. It's not always being the first to try new ideas, but the key is knowing when something's good and getting on it. Never stop learning."

 

VerHage Holsteins
From left, Jacob Mead, Sallianne Tanis, Kathryn Tanis, Jake Tanis and Lauren Tanis

Jake and Sallianne Tanis
Ideal Holsteins, Centre Hall, Pa.

At Ideal Holsteins, the Tanis family is currently milking 100 Registered Holsteins with ME Production Averages of 33,725 pounds of milk, 1,247 pounds of fat, and 1,004 pounds of protein. The herd is 100 percent homebred, has an average classification score of 83.37, and is milked twice a day in their tie-stall barn.

Jake grew up on a Guernsey farm in New Jersey, and has been at his current location in central Pennsylvania for 21 years. He says that he began breeding Registered Holsteins because he had always been intrigued by them, and impressed by the strength that they possessed. Ideal Holsteins has been recognized with the Progressive Breeders Registry award for 13 years, and this is the second year they have qualified as a Herd of Excellence. They use EASY and Tag ID with custom tags to register the calves on their farm.

Tanis appreciates strong cattle that have wide front ends, with plenty of dairyness and substance of bone. When selecting sires for the herd, he likes to use bulls from good cow families that rank high in type and components. Jake says that he has some exciting young cows in his barn currently sired by Stanhope Sovereign, a bull that fits his breeding philosophy well.

"My family has always tried to breed the best animals that we could, and having registered animals, being able to trace their genetics, allows us to do that," said Tanis.

Jake is quick to credit his wife and children for the success that they have attained with their farm. All of his children helped growing up, and his son, Adam, works there full-time now.

 

B-Long Holsteins
John Young, Maplelane-Manor Front Hon, Carolyn Turner and Jay Liddington

Benjamin and Carolyn Turner
Maplelane-Manor Farm, Apulia Station, N.Y.

Ben and Carolyn Turner have a 93.44 percent homebred herd of 120 cows, the largest herd of this year's honorees, with ME production averages of 32,558 pounds of milk, 1,278 pounds of fat, and 1,053 pounds of protein. Their average classification score is 83.16.

Ben is a full-time veterinarian, and Carolyn helps on the farm daily. They have two key employees - John Young, Carolyn's son, who manages the farm's field and crop work, and also milks, and Jay Liddington, who has been with them over 15 years and works mainly with the animals. The cows are milked twice a day in their tie-stall barn.

"We try to breed the 'total package'," said Carolyn. "If you've got the right feed and make sure that the cows are comfortable, the milk comes." Ben, Carolyn, and Jay work together to decide what bulls will be used in the herd, and cows are mated individually to complement strengths and correct weaknesses. A fine example of their breeding program is Maplelane-Manor Emerson Ed, who is scored VG-88, is a Gold Medal Dam, and has set several New York milk records. She has made 258,070 pounds of milk in 1,878 days, and is still producing. They work hard to maintain a steady routine for their animals, and feel it's important in getting the best results from the cows.

Maplelane-Manor is a true team effort. Carolyn says, "We couldn't do it if every person didn't work together. We try to make it a place where people enjoying working - we really love what we do. Registered Holsteins got us excited about dairying when we were younger, and it's still exciting today!"

 

Hilrose Holsteins
Heidi, Brayden and Clint Zank

Clint and Heidi Zank
Ridge-Place Holsteins, Neillsville, Wis.

Ridge-Place Holsteins, owned by Clint and Heidi Zank, is a 40 cow herd milked twice a day, with ME production averages of 32,851 pounds of milk, 1,155 pounds of fat, and 968 pounds of protein. The herd is 97.78 percent homebred with an average classification score of 85.41 points.

Clint has been in the dairy business his whole life, growing up on a dairy, and has farmed on his own for 10 years. The herd is enrolled in Holstein COMPLETE and has received the Progressive Breeders Registry award for five years. When making breeding decisions, Zank looks for bulls that rank high on the TPI list, and tries to select sires that are at least 3.5 for type, with 80 percent reliability or higher. He enjoys studying pedigrees and using bulls from strong cow families.

Descendants of one purchase Clint made have turned into very profitable members of the herd. C Mia Tab Sybil was a cow he purchased in Canada as an 82 point two-year old. She went on to eventually score EX-91 4E, produced over 300,000 pounds of milk, was recognized as a Gold Medal Dam, and lived to be 15 years old. She has an Excellent daughter who produced 300,000 pounds of milk, and two other daughters scored Excellent that have lifetime records totaling over 200,000.

Taking care of details and spending time with the cows is something that Zank feels has helped them achieve top performance from their animals. He noted that consistently checking for heats and getting cows bred has been important in maintaining high production levels.

Clint is responsible for the majority of the labor on the farm. His wife, Heidi, works in the medical field, and they have a son, Brayden, who is five. Zank's father still assists with the farm's crops.

 

For more information, contact Lindsey Worden, Communications Manager, at 800.952.5200, ext. 4096.
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Holstein Association USA Names Distinguished Junior Member Semifinalists

Brattleboro, Vt. (April 13, 2009)...Twelve semifinalists have been named in Holstein Association USA's Distinguished Junior Member (DJM) competition. Established in 1922, this is the highest honor that can be given to a Holstein Junior member. The contest is open to any Junior member of the Association, ages 17 to 21.

The 2009 Distinguished Junior Member semifinalists are: Jessica Achen, Sauk Centre, Minn.; Robyn Bechtel, Martinsburg, Pa.; Danielle Brown, Dodgeville, Wis.; Kayla Demmer, Peosta, Iowa; Katie Donnan, Galway, N.Y.; Ty Hildebrandt, Hustisford, Wis.; Emily Lyons, Rockford, Ill.; Matt Mitchell, LaFollette, Tenn.; Kristin Natzke, Fond du Lac, Wis.; Curtis Rhoderick, Mt. Airy, Md.; Jenna Smith, Martinsburg, Pa.; and Parker Welch, Chestertown, Md.

"Though Rocky Top Holsteins is by definition a small operation, it is serving a huge role in determining my career path," said Matt Mitchell in his Junior Project Story. "I am hopeful that combining my 'real world' education gained through operating my own dairy business with the academic insights gained through a college degree should uniquely position me to be a positive contributor in any phase of the dairy industry."

In her Junior Story, Danielle Brown stated, "My plans for the future are and will always be rooted in the dairy industry. Whatever I am doing, I know I will be working hard to improve and maintain the lifestyle of farming and the industry."

These twelve semifinalists will interview at the National Junior Holstein Convention, June 27-30 in Sacramento, Calif. From the group, six finalists will be chosen, and will receive annual renewed memberships to Holstein Association USA.

Contestants are judged on an entry book highlighting their Junior Holstein project work and involvement with activities, both in the Holstein and dairy industries, and their schools and communities.

"Holstein Junior members are among the most passionate and driven youth in the industry," said Kelli Dunklee, Holstein Association USA Youth Program Specialist. "This impressive group of DJM semifinalists is no exception to that. Their high level of participation in Junior programs, knowledge of the dairy industry and sincere interest in agriculture make them extremely deserving recipients of this honor.

For more information about this, or other Junior Holstein programs, contact Kelli Dunklee at 800.952.5200, ext. 4124 or visit www.holsteinusa.com/juniors.

For a hi-res photo of any of the DJM Semifinalists, contact Ben Briggs at 800.952.5200, ext. 4254.
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Outstanding Young Junior Holstein Members Recognized

Brattleboro, Vt. (April 13, 2009)...Holstein Association USA is pleased to recognized eight finalists in the annual Young Distinguished Young Member (YDJM) contest. Similar to the Distinguished Junior Member competition, the YDJM award is designed to recognize youth ages 9 to 16 for excelling in their Junior Holstein project work.

The 2009 Young Distinguished Junior Member finalists are: Rachel Achen, Sauk Centre, Minn.; Rocco Cunningham, Penngrove, Calif.; Carissa Doody, Union Bridge, Md.; Tatum Gillis, Schuylerville, N.Y.; Isaac Haagen, Howard, Pa.; Nicole Holdridge, Bloomville, N.Y.; Hayley Potts, Purcellville, Va.; and Derek Wasson, Centre Hall, Pa.

"My Holstein project is my life; add schoolwork, wrestling and FFA, and it gives me a full schedule," said Rocco Cunngingham in his Junior Project Story. "Working with cows is my first love, but a very close second is working with other Junior Holstein members."

In her project story, Carissa Doody stated, "I love being a member of such an outstanding organization that is so helpful in keeping young people interested in agriculture and the Holstein industry."

These eight junior members will be recognized at the National Junior Holstein Convention, June 27-30 in Sacramento, Calif. YDJM contestants are judged on an entry book, highlighting their Junior Holstein project work and involvement with activities, both in the Holstein and dairy industries, and their schools and communities.

"These exceptional, dedicated youth members display tremendous leadership skills and involvement working with Registered Holsteins," said Kelli Dunklee, Holstein Association USA Youth Program Specialist. "The high caliber and talent that these young people possess gets me excited about the future of the dairy industry."

For more information about this, or other Junior Holstein programs, contact Kelli Dunklee at 800.952.5200, ext. 4124 or visit www.holsteinusa.com/juniors.

For a hi-res photo of any of the DJM Semifinalists, contact Ben Briggs at 800.952.5200, ext. 4254.
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Holstein Association USA Board Holds Spring Meeting

Brattleboro, Vt. (April 13, 2009)...The board of directors of Holstein Association USA met for its spring meeting March 26-27 in Brattleboro, Vt. President Doug Maddox presided.

Staff and Committee Reports and Updates
Staff members provided updates on the 2009 Management-by-Objective Business Plan. The board heard reports from the Audit, International, and Nominating committees, and a summary was given on the 2009 Regional Member Meetings that were held across the country this winter.

Extensive discussion took place on the development of a dairy price stabilization program for milk in the United States. Dr. Robert Cropp, Professor Emeritus from the University of Wisconsin-Madison department of Agricultural and Applied Economics was in attendance to provide insight to the board on the current dairy economic environment, what the future may hold and possible solutions that would be applicable in today's industry. The Association will lead an effort toward a dairy price stabilization program for milk in the United States in a effort to stabilize the peaks and valleys of milk prices.

The board of directors approved a proposal that was brought forth by the Canadian Dairy Network (CDN) to reach an agreement between Holstein Association USA and CDN for the confidential exchange of genetic evaluations and pedigree information, necessary to calculate genomic evaluations, one week prior to their official release within the country. The data could then be blended into each country's genetic evaluations, with simultaneous public release on the official release day.

Also approved was a recommended addition to the Choice of Recovery section of the Cattle Merchandising and Advertising Policy. The policy now states that sellers will not be required to genomic test animals from which the selection is being made, or their dam, prior to the selection, unless the genomic testing was specified in the terms of the sale.

A proposal was made to change the genetic code for polled animals from *PC to *PO, based on a recommendation by the World Holstein Friesian Federation to standardize codes across countries. This was adopted, and the change will be seen on all materials following the release of the April 2009 genetic evaluations.

Upcoming Meetings
The next board of directors meeting will be held June 26-27, in Sacramento, Calif. Their fall meeting will be in Chicago, Ill., November 19-20.

For more information, contact Lindsey Worden, Communications Manager, at 800-952-5200, ext. 4096.
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Natzke Named Overall Collinsworth Winner

Brattleboro, Vt. (March 18, 2009)...Kristin Natzke, Fond du Lac, Wis., has been named the 2008 Overall Judi Collinsworth Outstanding Junior Exhibitor Memorial Award Winner by Holstein Association USA. She is the fifth Junior Holstein member to receive this prestigious honor. As the overall winner, Natzke will receive a $500 scholarship.

"I've had many memorable moments in the show ring throughout my Junior Holstein career, but one that highlights them all would definitely be when I received the Judi Collinsworth Outstanding Junior Holstein Exhibitor at World Dairy Expo this past year," said Natzke. "Being named the Overall Collinsworth Award winner made it even more special. This was something I always dreamed of accomplishing, and achieving this goal was a huge honor and makes me proud to have such a passion for registered Holsteins."

Natzke received the Judi Collinsworth Award at the International Junior Holstein Show in Madison, Wis. She is a junior at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. No stranger to the show ring, she has been proudly parading her Registered HolsteinsSM for 15 years. Her accomplishments are many, but highlights include breeding two generations of Crestbrooke Junior All-Americans, exhibiting the Champion Bred & Owned cow at two national shows in the same year and winning back-to-back titles in the Junior and Intermediate divisions of the World Dairy Expo Showmanship contest. Upon graduating with a degree in Dairy Science and Life Science Communications, Natzke plans to pursue a career in public relations and communications within the dairy industry.

Each year, the Collinsworth Award is presented in honor of former Holstein Executive Director of Member and Industry Services, Judi Collinsworth, to a Junior exhibitor at National Junior Holstein Shows. It rewards youth for their hard work and involvement with their cattle and dairy activities. Winners are selected on sportsmanship, herdsmanship and level of participation in Holstein activities.

Other winners at 2008 National Junior Holstein Shows were Katy Koester, Comanche, Texas, Southern Spring National Show; Stephanie Trenshaw, Goshen, Ind., Grand National Junior Show; and Parker Welch, Chestertown, Md., Premier National Junior Show. All winners receive $250 and are invited to apply for the Overall Collinsworth Award.

Applications for the Judi Collinsworth Award are available online, or at each of the four 2009 National Junior Holstein Shows.

For more information on Holstein Association youth activities, contact Kelli Dunklee at 800.952.5200, ext. 4124.

For more information, contact Lindsey Worden, Communications Manager, at 800-952-5200, ext. 4096.
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New Essay Contest Announced for Junior Holstein Members

Brattleboro, Vt. (March 18, 2009)...A new online contest is available for Junior members of Holstein Association USA. The Junior Essay Contest was developed to provide Junior Holstein members a chance to develop their writing skills and participate in a contest outside of those held at the National Junior Holstein Convention. Entries are due March 31, 2009, and may be submitted online or through the mail.

"With the launching of the new Junior Holstein Web site, we wanted to give youth another way to interact with the Association and be involved," said Lindsey Worden, Holstein Association USA Communications Manager. "The contest is meant to be a fun way for Juniors to express their passion for Registered HolsteinsSM and the dairy industry."

Entrants must be Junior members of Holstein Association USA. The contest has three age divisions: Junior, ages 9 to 13; Intermediate, ages 14 to 17; and Senior, ages 18 to 21. Each division has a separate topic and page limit, so be sure to see the complete rules and entry information. There is no limit to the number of entries from each state - any Junior Holstein member may submit an essay.

Essays will be judged on content, originality, clarity and quality of writing, accuracy, organization, and grammar. The winning entries will be announced on April 15, 2009 and published on the Junior Web site.

For more information on the Online Junior Essay Contest, contact Lindsey Worden, Communications Manager, at 800-952-5200, ext. 4096.
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Application Deadline Approaching for Holstein Association USA Awards

Brattleboro, Vt. (March 17, 2009)...Holstein Association USA offers awards recognizing notable members, breeders, and friends of the Association. Applications for the Distinguished Young Holstein Breeder, Elite Breeder, and Distinguished Leadership Award are due to the national office by March 31, 2009.

The Distinguished Young Holstein Breeder Award recognizes significant accomplishments of young Registered HolsteinSM breeders, ages 21-40. Applicants can nominate themselves or be nominated, and may apply as individuals, a couple, or business partners. The winning applicant will receive travel and lodging expenses for two to the National Holstein Convention, complimentary tickets to the Convention banquet, a $2,000 cash award, and a plaque.

The Elite Breeder Award honors a living Holstein Association USA member, family, partnership, or corporation who has bred outstanding animals and thereby made a notable contribution to the advancement of U.S. Registered Holsteins. The applicant must have been a member of Holstein Association USA for at least five years. Applications will be considered for three years.

The Distinguished Leadership Award is given to an individual who has provided outstanding and unselfish leadership that has contributed to the improvement of the Holstein Association and/or dairy industry. This is a unique award, as the recipient does not necessarily have to be a member of Holstein Association USA. Applications for this award will also be considered for three years.

Additionally, a scholarship is available to students interested in agriculture who plan to pursue their Master's Degree in Business Administration. The Robert H. Rumler MBA Scholarship awards $3,000 to a qualified individual pursuing their MBA at an accredited university. Applications for this scholarship are due to the Holstein office by April 15, 2009.

For more information on any of these awards, or to obtain an application, visit the individual awards page, or contact the national office at 800.952.5200.

For more information, contact Lindsey Worden, Communications Manager, at 800-952-5200, ext. 4096.
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Member Participation Shows Strong Interest In Holstein Association USA Programs

Brattleboro, Vt. (February 4, 2009)...During his State of the Association address at this year's Regional Member Meetings, Holstein Association USA CEO John M. Meyer reports a strong year for Holstein Association USA, marked by exceptional growth in the number of animals registered, as well as member participation in programs.

"From a member activity standpoint, 2008 will be remembered as a banner year for Holstein Association USA," said Meyer. "Registrations, the bread and butter of any pedigreed livestock association, totaled 348,033, which is one of the highest totals in the history of the Association. It is interesting to note that the 2008 registration total is 20 percent higher than what it was five years ago, and 10 percent higher compared to 2007."

Participation in Holstein COMPLETE increased last year, with 15 percent more animals and eight percent more herds enrolled in the program. COMPLETE is a package program that allows producers to conveniently bundle together several services, including annual membership, registrations, pedigrees, classification, and TriStarSM production records.

Meyer continued, "Classification activity continued to accelerate last year. In 2008, classifiers scored 235,606 animals in 5,681 herds, which is a 10 percent increase in herds and a nine percent increase in the number of animals classified." The Sire Evaluation for Type (SET) program showed positive growth as well, with classifiers evaluating five percent more animals in four percent more herds than in 2007.

The number of herds and animals enrolled in the TriStar Premier program also increased in 2008, with five percent more herds and 11 percent more animals enrolling.

Meyer finished his address by thanking members for their participation and support of Holstein Association USA. "We are pleased that the Holstein Association has been able to expand their market share."

For more information, contact Lindsey Worden, Communications Manager, at 800-952-5200, ext. 4096.
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Holstein Association USA Launching Redesigned Web Site

Brattleboro, Vt. (January 6, 2009)…Holstein Association USA is excited to announce the upcoming launch of a newly redesigned Web site at www.holsteinusa.com. The site has received a complete overhaul, with the goal of allowing members to access information and do business more easily. The site is expected to be online in late January.

Members will still have access to all of the features that they have in the past - the ability to order pedigrees, search for information on animals, view recognition lists, and download the latest genetic information. All of the menus and pages of information have been reorganized to provide easier, more intuitive navigation.

"The biggest change in the site will be the more user-friendly interface, which will allow members to access the information that they are looking for quickly and easily," said Lindsey Worden, Communications Manager. "Our aim is to have a Web site that members come to as their first source for information about Holstein cattle and Association news."

Some exciting new features are also being introduced. Members will have the option to order their official Holstein ear tags online and easily view account information and past orders. Other improvements include the ability to securely manage accounts and pay down account balances online, a site search function, and links to the most popular pages and lists right on the homepage.

For more information, contact Lindsey Worden, Communications Manager, at 800-952-5200, ext. 4096.
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Elliott Joins Holstein Association USA as Southwestern Regional Representative

Brattleboro, Vt. (January 6, 2009)…Holstein Association USA is pleased to announce that Jenny Elliott, Hico, Texas, is joining the Regional Representative staff in the Southwestern United States. Elliott will provide support to Registered HolsteinSM breeders in New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas.

"Jenny knows the area and is a real go-getter," said Andrew King, Regional Representative Tri-Captain. "She will be a real asset to the staff, and our members in the southwest region."

Elliott is a December 2008 graduate of Tarleton State University, with a degree in Agricultural Services and Development, with an emphasis in Agricultural Communications. In college, she was active with the Dairy Judging team, Tarleton Dairy Club, and was a member of the Student Programming Association's Traditions Committee. She has been recognized with the National Leadership Merit Award, and received the Tarleton Presidential Leadership Scholarship.

Growing up in the dairy industry, Elliott was active with the Texas Junior Holstein Association and enjoyed exhibiting her cattle at the local, state, and national levels.

Elliott has previously served as the Marketing Intern for Ag Workers Mutual Auto Insurance in Fort Worth, Texas. She will begin working in her area in January after Holstein Association USA's Annual Sales Conference and her orientation and training in Brattleboro, Vt.

"Holsteins have been my background, growing up," said Elliott. "I'm really looking forward to getting out, meeting members in my area, and helping them be more profitable with their Registered Holsteins."

For more information or to request a hi-res photo, contact Lindsey Worden, Communications Manager, at 800-952-5200, ext. 4096.
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Holstein Association USA, Inc., www.holsteinusa.com, provides products and services to dairy producers to enhance genetics and improve profitability-ranging from registry processing to identification programs to consulting services.

The Association, headquartered in Brattleboro, Vt., maintains the records for Registered Holsteins
SM and represents members throughout the United States. The Association is also leading the initiative for national animal identification through the National FAIR program.